O Captain, my Captain

O Captain, my Captain is the poem that got me started reading Walt Whitman - one of many works mentioned in Dead Poets Society that got me reading particular authors. Not exactly Whitman's most cheerful work.

Mom used to tell stories of her grandma Nace (my great grandmother) throwing apples at crazy old Walt Whitman as he went for his daily walk near his home in Camden, The kids of the town thought that he was a crazy old man. But he was a man who took his personal tragedies - mostly having to do with his brothers - and turned them into beauty, poetry, and a lifetime of service to the wounded of the civil war.

And now, when so many people are quoting "O Captain, My Captain" in reference to Robin Williams, I have to wonder if they've read past the first line - a deeply tragic poem about the death of President Lincoln, in which he is imagined as a ship captain who doesn't quite make it into harbor, after his great victories. Chillingly apropos of yesterday's tragic end to the brilliant career of Robin Williams.

Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
But I with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

BAHA, five years on.

Five years ago, my beloved encouraged me to get a BAHA - Bone Attached Hearing Aid. It's a device that's implanted in my skull which bypasses the usual hearing apparatus and carries sound vibrations directly to the middle ear.

It would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that this tiny device has prrofoundly changed my life.

I've always been an introvert, and social situations make me uncomfortable ... but I say that based on all of those years avoiding them because my deafness made them so very awkward. The elaborate dance of positioning myself correctly relative to speakers so that I could hear out of my right ear, hurrying to be the first to be seated at a dinner so that I can grab the left-most seat, and avoiding multi-speaker conversations because I'm bound to miss most of it, has been going on since I was 12, and it's hard to remember how things were before that.

While I still can't tolerate super-loud settings - which makes most conference social events something of a chore, endured for the all-important networking - the Baha has changed normal conversation from a painful ordeal, preferably to be avoided, into something more normal and routine, where I can, for the most part, understand what is being said, the first time, without needing several increasingly embarrassing repetitions.

There are still scenarios where it's hard to hear. The very loud places, as mentioned above, for one. Also, conversations with many speakers tend to be difficult, but apparently the latest model of Cochlear's product has intelligent selective filtering, as well as noise reduction stuff in it, and perhaps I can upgrade some day for an even better experience.

Being able to hear has made me more confident, more sure of my opinions, more assertive in meetings, and less irritable with soft-spoken people. And far less awkward in social settings.

And I can sit anywhere I want at dinner.

RDO on CentOS 7

With CentOS 7 now available, I quickly put it on my OpenStack demo laptop, and started installing RDO. It mostly just worked, but there were a few roadblocks to circumvent.

As usual, I followed the RDO Quickstart, so I won't duplicate those steps here, in detail, but it goes like:

sudo yum update -y && sudo yum install -y http://rdo.fedorapeople.org/rdo-release.rpm && sudo yum install -y openstack-packstack && packstack --allinone

Comparison of string with 7 failed

The first problem occurs pretty quickly, in prescript.pp, with the following error message:

Comparison of String with 7 failed

This is due to the change in CentOS versioning scheme - the latest release of CentOS is version 7.0.1406, which is not a number. The script in question assumes that the version number is a number, and does a numerical comparison:

if $::operatingsystem in $el_releases and $::operatingsystemrelease 7 { ...

This fails, because $::operatingsystemrelease is a string, not a number.

The solution here is to edit the file /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/packstack/puppet/templates/prescript.pp and replace the variable $::operatingsystemrelease with $::operatingsystemmajrelease around line 15.

While you're at it, do this for every file in that directory, where $operatingsystemrelease is compared to 7.

See https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1117035 for more detail, and to track when this is fixed.

mysql vs mariadb

The second problem, I'm not sure I understand just yet. The symptom is that mysql.pp fails with

Error: Could not enable mysqld:

To skip to the end of the story, this appears to be related to the switch from mysql to mariadb about a year ago, finally catching up with CentOS. The related bug is at https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=981116

The workaround that I used was:

# rm /usr/lib/systemd/system/mysqld.service 
# cp /usr/lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service /usr/lib/systemd/system/mysqld.service
# systemctl stop mariadb
# pkill mysql
# rm -f /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock

Then run packstack again with the generated answer file from the last time.

However, elsewhere in the thread, we were assured that this shouldn't be necessary, so YMMV. See https://www.redhat.com/archives/rdo-list/2014-July/msg00055.html for further discussion.

That's all, folks

After those two workarounds, packstack completed successfully, and I have a working allinone install.

Hope this was helpful to someone.

UPDATE: The next time through, I encountered https://ask.openstack.org/en/question/35705/attempt-of-rdo-aio-install-icehouse-on-centos-7/

The workaround is to replace contents of /etc/redhat-release with "Fedora release 20 (Heisenbug)" and rerun packstack.

Red Hat at the OpenStack Summit

A few weeks ago I was at the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, Georgia, and I spoke with several Red Hat engineers about their work on OpenStack. Here's a few of those conversations when I actually had the microphone running.

Listen to it HERE, or subscribe to my podcast to listen to it in your favorite podcast app.

Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline

I just got done reading Ready Player One by @erniecline, which was recommended to me by @smerrill.

In a word, wow.

In more than a word, this was a great read, full of nostalgia, awesome geek humor, clever puzzles, and a ripping great story.

I finished reading OtherLand, by Tad Williams just a few weeks ago, and their interpretations of what VR/CyberSpace look like are very similar - perhaps because it's what it'll end up looking like some day. But their storytelling is very, very different.

@erniecline's view of what the world will be in just a few short years is pretty chilling - again, because it seems so likely.

Recommended. Buy it here.




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Some people are heroes. And some people jot down notes. Sometimes, they're the same person. (The Truth. Terry Pratchett)